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Kentaro Toyama

Kentaro Toyama

W K Kellogg Professor of Community Information and Professor of Information, School of Information Email: toyama@umich.edu Phone: 734/763-8427
Office: School of Information/NQ 3439 Faculty Role: Faculty Potential PhD Faculty Advisor: Yes Personal website

Biography

Kentaro Toyama is W.K. Kellogg Professor of Community Information at the University of Michigan School of Information and a fellow of the Dalai Lama Center for Ethics and Transformative Values at MIT. He is the author of Geek Heresy: Rescuing Social Change from the Cult of Technology. For more information see http://kentarotoyama.org.

Previously, he was a researcher at UC Berkeley and assistant managing director of Microsoft Research India, which he co-founded in 2005. At MSR India, he started the Technology for Emerging Markets research group, which conducts interdisciplinary research to understand how the world's poorer communities interact with electronic technology and to invent new ways for technology to support their socio-economic development. The award-winning group is known for projects such as MultiPoint, Text-Free User Interfaces, and Digital Green. Kentaro co-founded the IEEE/ACM International Conference on Information and Communication Technologies and Development (ICTD) to provide a global platform for rigorous academic research in this field. He is also co-editor-in-chief of the journal Information Technologies and International Development.

Prior to his time in India, Kentaro did computer vision and multimedia research at Microsoft Research in Redmond, WA, USA and Cambridge, UK, and taught mathematics at Ashesi University in Accra, Ghana.

Areas of interest

Information and communication technologies and development (ICTD), aspiration-based social development, theories of social change, data-centric analysis of social justice issues

Education

AB, Harvard University, physics

PhD, Yale University, computer science

News

Headshots of Tawanna Dillahunt, Julie Hui, Kentaro Toyama and Mustafa Naseem. "UMSI researchers were awarded a $1.4 M grant for their project The Community Tech Workers: A Community-Driven Model to Support Economic Mobility and Bridge the Digital Divide in the U.S.”
How Can Communities Best Bridge the Digital Divide

UMSI researchers were awarded a grant for their project “The “Community Tech Workers”: A Community-Driven Model to Support Economic Mobility and Bridge the Digital Divide in the U.S.

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2021-2022 Faculty Awards
Faculty awards recognize outstanding instruction, leadership and community-engaged research

Five faculty members have received recognition for teaching excellence and for their service to the community and UMSI.

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