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Julie Hui

Julie Hui

Assistant Professor of Information, School of Information Email: juliehui@umich.edu Phone: 734/763-2285
Office: School of Information/3431 North Quad Faculty Role: Faculty Potential PhD Faculty Advisor: Yes Website

Biography

I investigate how technology influences access to work and employment. My current research areas include working with under-resourced small businesses, gig workers, and job seekers. In these areas, I build partnerships with local organizations to co-develop and test new models of work and resource sharing, question the role of technology in socio-economic mobility, and develop platforms to enhance professional relationship development (see https://lettersmith.io/about).

Broadly, I am interested in computer-supported career development, job training in the future of work, and community development. I'm always looking for new collaborations and am currently recruiting PhD students.

Pronouns

she/her

Areas of Interest

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI); Computer-Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW); Future of work; Gig work; Equity

Education

PhD in Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University; BS in Physics, MIT

News

Headshots of Tawanna Dillahunt, Julie Hui, Kentaro Toyama and Mustafa Naseem. "UMSI researchers were awarded a $1.4 M grant for their project The Community Tech Workers: A Community-Driven Model to Support Economic Mobility and Bridge the Digital Divide in the U.S.”
How Can Communities Best Bridge the Digital Divide

UMSI researchers were awarded a grant for their project “The “Community Tech Workers”: A Community-Driven Model to Support Economic Mobility and Bridge the Digital Divide in the U.S.

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Tawanna Dillahunt and Julie Hui were awarded the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation Community-Engaged Research Grant
U-M awarded grant to support Detroit entrepreneurs in bridging digital divide

An interdisciplinary team from the University of Michigan was awarded $300,000 from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to train local residents and U-M students to provide one-on-one technology support to Detroit entrepreneurs.

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